Tag Archives: Q&A

Continued Q&A with Diversity club

By Annalise Bassett and Destiny Love

Senior Sydney Palmer – Member of Diversity Club

The Bagpiper: How does diversity club bring students together?

Sydney Palmer: Diversity brings students together because we are able to recognize our differences and how they make us ourselves.  

BP: What does a typical meeting of this club look like?

SP: We have meetings in Mrs. Waiz’s class during fourth period, and it includes the council talking about current issues in the school, reading survey responses, and discussing experiences that have occurred at FCHS involving discrimination.

BP: How does Diversity Club bring students together?

SP: This club brings minorities together so they have a place to talk about their concerns but also connect on another level. The diversity advisory council was not meant to exclude anyone, and we just want everyone to know that it was created to educate everyone on the importance of diversity!

BP: What is your favorite celebration/event?

SP: We don’t really have events.

BP: Why is this club important to you?

SP: This club is important to me because I want to show that our school is accepting of everyone and defeats the stereotypes.

BP: How does this club affect your life?

SP: It affects my life because I’m able to empathize with the struggles minorities have gone through and understand what I can do to help.

BP: What do you like about the club?

SP: I like that it’s a place for everyone to talk about anything they need to discuss.

BP: Why did you originally join the club?

SP: I joined the club because I wanted to promote diversity in our school

BP: What other clubs are you a member of?

SP: I am in Diversity advisory council, student council, renaissance club, and interact club.

 

Junior Nicole Holland- Member of Diversity Club

The Bagpiper: How does diversity club bring students together?

Nicole Holland: The Diversity Advisory Council brings people together by bringing in all kinds of people. we all have different hobbies but share one end goal and that’s spreading awareness of other cultures in our school, whether you’re white or colored.

BP: What does a typical meeting of diversity club look like?

NH: A typical meeting is us gathered in a classroom, typically ms. waiz’s room and we throw out ideas of how we can grow and improve. we discuss problems in our school and how we improve them.

BP: What do you like about this club?

NH: This club makes me feel like my opinion is heard and cared about, and i know a lot of the other members feel that way as well. there are many students who felt like they were different from everyone else and this is a place where we can all relate and understand we aren’t alone in our experiences.

BP: What are your goals for next year?

NH: The Diversity Advisory Council has already experienced a lot of backlash in it’s opening stages, but we’re all fully prepared to go through it and we’ll continue until our message is heard. we’ll be expanding our council and it’s influence as time continues.

BP: What does this club mean to you?

NH: To me this council means a chance for me to make an impact. it’s been too long that my voice and opinion has been shut down, and this is my chance to help someone else experiencing discrimination.

BP: How has the club affected your life?

NH: The Diversity Advisory Council has positively affected my life. it makes me really happy to see such a diverse group of people working together to make a change.

BP: What is your favorite thing about the club?

NH: My favorite thing about it is hearing everyone else’s opinions. meeting new people and being able to share experiences without being afraid of judgement feels really nice as well.

BP: What is your favorite event?

NH: My favorite event is in the esports club. next year we’re planning for a LAN party where people outside the esports club can come join us for games and win prizes. hopefully we’ll get more members that way as well.

 

Q&A with School Nurse Melissa Eldridge

By Natalie Clare

  1. Why are vaccinations important?
    1. Vaccinations are important because they keep us from getting sick.  The diseases that we have vaccinations for can ultimately kill people. They’re deadly and fatal and very contagious. They can spread and wipe out certain groups of people. Vaccinations are important ultimately to keep our population going, to keep the human race going.
  2. Do you believe vaccinations are necessary? Why or why not?
    1. I do. I’m definitely for vaccinations. I understand that some people have allergies or medical conditions where it’s not supportive that they have vaccines. I understand religious objections, those are very personal and individualized. But, I think if you are physically able to get vaccinated and it doesn’t go strongly against your beliefs, then I believe everybody should get vaccinated. In the long run, that’s what is keeping people healthy and at their optimum level.
  3. Why are students required to get vaccinations in order to come to school?
    1. Currently, there is a mumps outbreak and meningitis is coming back. They said on the news this morning that Indiana University of Bloomington has a mumps outbreak. Because we are all in such close quarters, you have to think that they are almost 2000 people in this building that are coming in contact every single day. Things spread very easily in this environment because we are all very close. Same thing with colleges, you’ve got dorms and other close quarters. So, if one person were to get a contagious disease, it’s going to be no time at all and the majority of us are probably going to have because we come in contact one way or another. If it’s not direct contact, it’s airborne or continental contact, like touching the same desks and door knobs.
  4. Can parents request to not have their child vaccinated? How? Why?
    1. Absolutely. Parents can fill out regions objection forms or they can go to a doctor and get a medical objection form. If it is against their beliefs or they have some type of medical reason that they can’t get a vaccine. They always have the option to object. But, according to our school policy, if we were to have an outbreak of something and a student wasn’t vaccinated, we would have the right to exclude them. More than anything, for their safety. It’s kind of a risk if you choose to not be vaccinated. Be aware of the risks that your are putting yourself at a chance at getting a contagious disease. Although, chicken pox isn’t necessarily a deadly disease, but you have more serious diseases like polio or meningitis.
  5. Can you really become sick by getting vaccinated? Or is that just a myth?
    1. I think it depends. I know that there are a lot of people that are anti-vaccine and talk about how they increase your risk for autism or other things. There is a small chance. You occasionally hear of somebody having an adverse reaction to a vaccine, especially if it’s a live vaccine. Which is where they do inject a small amount of the virus in you. But again, they take precautions. They always take precautions when giving vaccines, like if you’ve been sick or have recently had the flu, you’re doctor should say that this is not the right time to get a vaccine because you might be putting yourself at risk for getting sick. It’s very rare for someone to get sick after having a vaccine or contracting autism. I’ve never seen a huge amount of evidence to say that vaccines cause this, this, and this. Vaccines are here to prevent, not to cause other things. People talk about getting sick after having a vaccine, or contracting something. This is rare, it’s the exception not the rule.
  6. Are there any vaccinations that aren’t required but recommended?
    1. Right now, the CDC has recommended meningitis B, which protects against another strand of meningitis. You’re required to have your two meningitis vaccines. Because you have all of these kids that are going off to college, their going to new environments, they’re living in dorm rooms, and in close contact, you’re putting yourself at a greater risk at picking up a communicable disease. So Men. B is recommended and HPV is recommended based on research.
  7. Will the school be having a vaccination clinic? When? Where?
    1. Our vaccination clinic is Tuesday, April 23rd. It’s offered to juniors becoming seniors. This gives them an opportunity to get up to date on the required vaccines for their senior year, like the second dose of meningitis and the two Hep. A vaccines.

Interview with IDOE Press Secretary Adam Baker

Story by Annalise Bassett

What qualifies a bullying incident for reporting to the IDOE?

Bullying as defined by Indiana Code 20-33-8-0.2 means overt, unwanted, repeated acts or gestures including verbal or written communications or images transmitted in any manner (including digitally or electronically), physical acts committed, aggression, or any other behaviors, that are committed by a student or group of students against another student with the intent to harass, ridicule, humiliate, intimidate, or harm the targeted student and create for the targeted student an objectively hostile school environment that:
– places the targeted student in reasonable fear of harm to the targeted student’s person or property;
– has a substantially detrimental effect on the targeted student’s physical or mental health;
– has the effect of substantially interfering with the targeted student’s academic performance; or
– has the effect of substantially interfering with the targeted student’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, and privileges provided by the school.

How does the IDOE follow up with schools reporting zero incidents of bullying, and does it actually sound reasonable for big schools to report zero incidents of bullying?
Per Indiana Code 20-34-6-2, the Indiana Department of Education may conduct an audit of a school corporation to ensure accurate reporting of bullying incidents, and all discrepancies in reporting will also be posted on the IDOE website. Following the 2018 legislative session , parents can now “kickstart” the audit process if they too feel their school’s numbers are inaccurate.
I do not want to speculate on the reasonability of data as we know over the years schools have instituted conflict resolution classes to help education students on how to better handle and respond to situations as to curb bullying within their schools.

Are there any consequences for schools not reporting or falsely reporting bullying incidents, and what are they if so?
The department performs an audit and finds a school’s numbers to not be accurate, the data for that school will be updated and reflected in the annual bullying report.

How does the IDOE investigate and confirm that schools reporting zero incidents are being truthful with their reports?
Per statute, the Indiana Department of Education does not have authority to investigate rates of bullying. This is a manner that falls under the jurisdiction of local school boards.

Q&A with senior Aaron Nottke

By Gracie Vanover

Aaron Nottke is a senior trumpet player in marching band, concert band, pep band, and concert band. This year, Nottke lead a group of 15 students in a trumpet choir for solo and ensemble. They received a gold at district and are advancing to state competition on this Saturday.

BP: How do you lead your ensemble?

Aaron Nottke: “I will have them play something, I’ll listen to it, and give them suggestions to make it sound better.”

BP: As a leader what’s the hardest challenge for you?

AN: “Staying positive and keeping everyone focused during rehearsal.”

BP: What aspect of being a leader is your favorite?

AN: “The best part of being a leader is reaping the benefits of the effort that you put in, and I get to experience that.”

BP: How does your group work together?

AN: “The group works pretty well with each other; however it, is often times difficult for everyone to stay focused. While playing everyone listens to each others parts and for the most part they will fix things on their own with repetitions.”

BP: As a senior how does it feel to know this is your last shot to get a gold at state?

AN: “I couldn’t be more excited for state, and I know I’ll be happy regardless of whether we get gold or not, as long as everyone puts forth their best effort.”

BP: What has shaped you for the role of being a leader?

AN: “Years of experience with band and learning from my own mistakes as well as others’ has changed and shaped me into the person I am today.”

BP: How do you encourage your group in hard times?

AN: “When things don’t sound great during rehearsal I try to emphasize the positive things they are doing while still working to fix the negative.”

BP: How do you hope to impact your group in the end?

AN: “I hope to leave them with good memories and hopefully as better musicians.”

 

Q&A with Faye Eades, creator of this Sunday’s Senior Dinner Dance

By Aurora Robinson

Bagpiper: What is it that you are doing with Senior Dinner Dance?

Faye Eades: “Last year I started the Senior Dinner Dance. It was something that I had gone to Dr. Willman about at the beginning of last year. There were some changes to the Senior Week and they were no longer able to do the full Senior Week. So they were switching it to just one day, it was senior lunch. And I was just looking for a different opportunity for the students to have to socialize and have a fun time together. So I presented this idea to Dr. Willman last year and with it being the school’s 50th anniversary and having changes to Senior Week he thought this would be a good new addition to start last year. We had a good turnout. The students really enjoyed themselves. Therefore, he said that we could have it again this year and hopefully in future years to come. This seems to be something that the seniors have enjoyed and have an interest in attending.”

BP: So, you started Senior Dinner Dance?

FE: “I got the idea because when I was in high school, my high school had a senior dinner dance and it was something we enjoyed. So I presented that idea to Dr. Willman. Yes, you could say I started it, but Dr. Willman is the one who gave the approval to have the event.”

BP: In short, what are the details for the Senior Dinner Dance? What will happen that evening?

FE: “It is held at the Olmsted. It is in Louisville. It will be this Sunday evening, Feb. 17th from 6 to 10 p.m. Students will arrive and there will be a photographer there to take pictures. There will be about a 30-minute time frame for them to have just small appetizers and fruit and cheese and then to grab a drink. And then they will be seated and served dinner. After the dinner course then there will also be a dessert served. After that is done, what we did last year is we took a group picture of all the seniors that were in attendance, all of them together. Then after all of that was done, the DJ started playing-DJ Tank is his name. The students had a great time and most of them didn’t leave the dance floor until the night was over.”

BP: What would you say is the most exciting part about Senior Dinner Dance?

FE: “I think the students enjoy coming because I think it is enjoyable for them to be together as a class. Kind of, really, one of the first times they are together or have the opportunity to be together and enjoy a social event together. They do prom together, but that’s the juniors and the seniors. This event is not as formal as the prom. The attire is less formal. It’s just a nice Sunday dress. The guys dress in nice shirts and slacks, most of them wear ties, but it is not to the caliber of having to get all fixed up like prom. With dinner being served at the dance, it also takes away from the element of having to make reservations for dinner and make sure you can get a ride to prom on time. I think it is just a great opportunity for the students to be together, and get a little bit dressed up, but not too formal and enjoy having fun together for the evening.”

BP: Anything to add?

FE: “I just want to encourage the younger students, the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, to talk to the seniors after the event and hear how much they enjoy it and look forward to the event. It is just a great opportunity for students, like I have said, to have this night together and I hope that it is a tradition that the students continue to embrace and want to have for years to come.”