Tag Archives: New Albany

Baddude reflects on football career before college

Photo by Brock Kennedy

Story by J.D. McKay

My football career in southern Indiana is over. My last season was exciting. We won sectionals. We also beat New Albany, Jeff, and Providence. It is crazy that it is over. 

I started playing football when I was three years old. I would run routes with my dad, and if I could not get anyone to play with me, I would throw the football up to myself as Peyton Manning and run under it as Dallas Clark. I also would play football in my living room. Astonishingly, I have no scars on my head or body from running into furniture, the fireplace, or mantle during these games. However, I did lose my second tooth playing football with my dad. 

Fast forward to when I was seven, and I played flag football for the first time. Since then, I have not missed a year of football. After one year of flag, I played tackle for the first time. My dad was always one of my coaches. I played almost every skill position on offense in Little League. However, I spent most of my time at QB. One of my funniest memories from Little League was my center, senior linebacker and center Adam Hynes, wearing a cup when I was under center. Another good memory came from fourth grade. My team, the Bengals, beat the undefeated Colts in the Super Bowl, winning my only little league championship. I still have that trophy. 

In fifth grade, my dad started coaching at Highland Hills. He suggested to head FC coach Brian Glesing that he have some actual ball boys instead of injured players having the balls ready during the game. So, starting in fifth grade, I have been on the sideline at all but about two Friday night games, except for my freshman year. 

One of the most memorable games came from fifth grade at Jennings County. It rained, snowed and sleeted like crazy that game. The weird thing was, the whole day was warm, so most people were unprepared for the cold, including several coaches, who wore shorts the whole game. 

Seventh grade was my worst season by record. However, the next year coach Tom Hodge became head coach and we were 7-1. The QB-to-TE connection senior Trace Willman and I had that year was like Tom Brady and Rob Gronkowski. I caught a ball from him one handed, and, of course, tripped as I turned upfield. He also delivered a perfect pass that I did not trip on and took 40 yards for the game tying touchdown against River Valley. The next play, D-1 senior kicker Cole Hussung took in the two-point conversion for the win. That was the last TD I scored until this year. 

My freshman year, I saw a potential opening on varsity the following year and moved to guard as well as playing linebacker. The paid off the next season when I started as guard from Week 4 on. 

Week 3 of that year was against Madison. It was just after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, so the remains of it were on their way up. It hit us during the game and was the coldest, wettest, nastiest game I have ever played in. 

Unfortunately, the injury bug hit us that game but it opened up a varsity spot for me. Eventually, we pounded the ball against New Albany for two straight games and won the Anchor and the first round of sectionals. That team was very good, but unfortunately, we lost to Columbus East, who was on their way to a state championship. I like to say that we were their closest game, though, only losing to them by 30. 

Last year, I was hit with my first injury in football. I was out from the fifth play of the first game to Week 4. Unfortunately, we were 5-5 last season. I got to play with the best player I have played with so far in Tyler Edwards. He was excellent at hitting creases at running back and reading plays as an outside linebacker.

I also played LB with Levi Hamby. He started playing his sophomore year after going to Christian Academy. He showed underclassmen what great work ethic was. He had to work very hard to even have a chance at playing varsity after starting late. But, he put in work in the weight room and on the field, eventually leading the team in tackles. 

This season was my favorite season of football so far, though. I am sure everyone reading this is shocked by that. I was a captain along with senior Calvin Brown. We won sectionals for the first time in 10 years, completed the sweep (beat New Albany, Jeff, and Providence every year for four years), and finished 9-3. In Week 3 against Vincennes Lincoln, we had six picks. I had one, and Willman took one for six with a cast on his left hand. The next week, we tied the record for the biggest margin of victory against the Dogs, beating them 50-14. We started down 0-14 that game but scored 50 unanswered. The following week, we beat Jeff in the National Guard jerseys. I think I gained a lot of confidence that game that carried through the rest of the season. 

The first round of sectionals was another close, physical battle with Bedford (check out my column on the BNL FC rivalry https://fchsbagpiper.wordpress.com/2019/11/06/bedford-football-rivalry-has-grown-recently/). Then, the next week, we won sectionals. I had my first TD since eighth grade after the Jeff running back fumbled the pitch and after trying to grab it, knocked it into the ground and into my hands. That play has been my favorite individual moment of playing football. Our defense played lights out against Jeff and gave up 0 defensive points. Last Friday was my last high school game. We were up 14-13 at half but stalled in the second half, eventually losing 40-14. I had a pick on the second play of the half, but it did not matter. 

Next year, I am hoping to play football at Wheaton College in Illinois, with a bunch of dudes who love Jesus, as well as a coach who loves Jesus and also has a win percentage over .800 and is ranked third in Division 3 currently.

 

Former student discusses Culbertson Mansion history

By Brianna Waggoner

150 years ago, William Culbertson walked into the grand yellow mansion on East Main Street with his wife Cornelia. Today, that mansion retains undying hospitality and honor, as well as historical value for the city of New Albany.

According to Culbertson Mansion program developer Kaitlyn Tisdale, William Culbertson came to New Albany when he was 21 years old and started his dry-goods business with his brother, John Culbertson. Together, they sold fabrics, clothing, and leather goods, working “hand-over-fist,” as Tisdale describes.

“William Culbertson did not believe in marking up his products, and by not marking his products up, he became the most competitive dealer in town, so everyone wanted his business because they were getting the better deal,” said Tisdale.

Eventually, Culbertson became one of the wealthiest men in Indiana during the 1860s. Tisdale refers to him as a “King Midas” because of his talent in investment.

“He was a very wise investor. Anything he invested in turned to gold,” said Tisdale. “By the 1860s, he was a multimillionaire.”

Unheard of at the time, Cornelia was allowed to design the mansion despite being a woman. She was even credited as the architect of the house when it was built.

“I think it wasn’t until 60 years later that they had even socially accepted a woman to designing, so the fact that William allowed her to do that is just incredible, and that’s another reason why I’m so proud to work here,” said event coordinator Bryce Romig, a 2014 FC graduate.

While English teacher Tim Romig knows the history of the mansion, it is not his main interest.

“I’ve learned like who built it, when they built it, why they built it. I mostly like to focus on the dark history like hauntings and stuff like that,” said Mr. Romig.

The home took two full years to build. Construction began in 1867 and the Culbertson family walked into the completed mansion in 1869. Furthermore, it had heat and running water, features most homes did not have at the time.

“Nobody had running water inside their house. It had central heat in the form of a coal-burning furnace. Nobody had that. Businesses had furnaces that could put out heat. Not homes,” said Tisdale.

William Culbertson had ten kids and three wives in total, so many servants were needed to run the home efficiently.

“There was always a staff of about 12 servants here working that [were] men and women, mainly immigrants. It was a workplace and a home, so you have to keep that in mind. The Culbertsons couldn’t have lived in this house without them,” said Tisdale.

Four years after Cornelia Culbertson passed away of cholera in 1880, William married his third wife, Rebecca. In moving into the mansion, she made a few changes to the interior. Tisdale notes that she didn’t make any major architectural changes to the mansion such as tearing down walls, showing respect towards Cornelia’s original ideas when she was alive.

After William Culbertson died at age 78, the mansion switched ownership to the McDonald family and then the American Legion, where it underwent many changes, including sealing the basement floor with cement and tearing down walls. The house is now owned by the state as a historical site.

“It’s been through many a-changes but I’m really glad it’s back in the state’s hands today,” said Bryce. “I always say we want to take it right back to the very first day the Culbertsons ever set foot in here, so everything that we’re doing, we’re trying to replicate back to exactly what it would have looked like when they were here.”

Because his son and step daughter both work at the Culbertson Mansion, Mr. Romig is often able to walk through the mansion with his own tour.

“My tour, I run the New Albany Odd Walk, we go there on occasion, and we also get to go inside and tell stories,” said Mr. Romig.

Along with tours being available at the Culbertson Mansion, the haunted house event is heavily advertised as well. Bryce offers advice for those interested in participating.

“I believe standard admission for an adult is 15 dollars,” said Bryce. “You may have to wait in a line, so maybe wear a jacket because it starts to get very chilly.”

Opening day for “Literally, a Haunted House,” the annual haunted house event at the Culbertson, starts Sept. 27 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

The house typically has a sign outside of every mishap at the haunted house, such as how many people left the tour early or how many people wet themselves. Bryce encourages visitors to “come with a brave face on.”

 

FC win against New Albany captured old Indiana Basketball emotions

By J.D. McKay

Friday night’s game against New Albany was what Indiana high school basketball is supposed to be. A gym that holds 2,500 fans had about 2,600 fans from rival schools, with an atmosphere that reminded long time Highlander fans, including my mom, of past games between Pat Graham and Damon Bailey. Bobby Knight attended the Graham vs Bailey games. Last Friday, it was current Indiana head coach Archie Miller watching New Albany senior Romeo Langford. The Highlanders came out on top by two back then, just as they did Friday, mainly because of an average performance from Langford and an above average performance from senior Luke Gohmann.

Last Wednesday I predicted that to win, we would need to shut Langford down, rebound, and hit three pointers. Langford was stopped. Holding the fifth best player in his class to 15 points is basically shutting him down, and he travel on two of those. Rebounds weren’t much of a problem, and while we hit five threes, the lack of points didn’t seem to matter.

The Bulldogs main threat was senior Sean East. East was hitting shots from all over the court, including hitting a buzzer beater from the volleyball line to end the first half. East had 19 points.

Defense was really the key to success Friday. Only scoring 12 points in the second half obviously makes that important. With junior Cobie Barnes being out in the second half, that task came down to senior Matt Weimer, Gohmann, and senior Evan Nichols. Barnes missing most of the second half probably wasn’t in Coach Todd Sturgeon’s game plan, so those three stepped up well.

Final, in overtime, two guys that hadn’t scored yet, senior Gabe Shireman, and Weimer, stepped up. Shireman went straight to the hole twice to take a 43-47 lead. Then, after four New Albany points, Weimer made a backdoor cut and hit a layup to go up 49-47. After Langford missed a three and the officials called a questionable travel, New Albany had one last chance. Sophomore big man Trey Hourigan missed a three, and time expired.

After a quick handshake line that seemed to take two hours, we stormed the court. After 21 tries, the Highlanders finally beat the Bulldogs. So, I guess you could call that game an Indiana high school basketball classic.  

FC beats New Albany 49-47 in overtime last night