Tag Archives: Natalie Clare

Q&A with School Nurse Melissa Eldridge

By Natalie Clare

  1. Why are vaccinations important?
    1. Vaccinations are important because they keep us from getting sick.  The diseases that we have vaccinations for can ultimately kill people. They’re deadly and fatal and very contagious. They can spread and wipe out certain groups of people. Vaccinations are important ultimately to keep our population going, to keep the human race going.
  2. Do you believe vaccinations are necessary? Why or why not?
    1. I do. I’m definitely for vaccinations. I understand that some people have allergies or medical conditions where it’s not supportive that they have vaccines. I understand religious objections, those are very personal and individualized. But, I think if you are physically able to get vaccinated and it doesn’t go strongly against your beliefs, then I believe everybody should get vaccinated. In the long run, that’s what is keeping people healthy and at their optimum level.
  3. Why are students required to get vaccinations in order to come to school?
    1. Currently, there is a mumps outbreak and meningitis is coming back. They said on the news this morning that Indiana University of Bloomington has a mumps outbreak. Because we are all in such close quarters, you have to think that they are almost 2000 people in this building that are coming in contact every single day. Things spread very easily in this environment because we are all very close. Same thing with colleges, you’ve got dorms and other close quarters. So, if one person were to get a contagious disease, it’s going to be no time at all and the majority of us are probably going to have because we come in contact one way or another. If it’s not direct contact, it’s airborne or continental contact, like touching the same desks and door knobs.
  4. Can parents request to not have their child vaccinated? How? Why?
    1. Absolutely. Parents can fill out regions objection forms or they can go to a doctor and get a medical objection form. If it is against their beliefs or they have some type of medical reason that they can’t get a vaccine. They always have the option to object. But, according to our school policy, if we were to have an outbreak of something and a student wasn’t vaccinated, we would have the right to exclude them. More than anything, for their safety. It’s kind of a risk if you choose to not be vaccinated. Be aware of the risks that your are putting yourself at a chance at getting a contagious disease. Although, chicken pox isn’t necessarily a deadly disease, but you have more serious diseases like polio or meningitis.
  5. Can you really become sick by getting vaccinated? Or is that just a myth?
    1. I think it depends. I know that there are a lot of people that are anti-vaccine and talk about how they increase your risk for autism or other things. There is a small chance. You occasionally hear of somebody having an adverse reaction to a vaccine, especially if it’s a live vaccine. Which is where they do inject a small amount of the virus in you. But again, they take precautions. They always take precautions when giving vaccines, like if you’ve been sick or have recently had the flu, you’re doctor should say that this is not the right time to get a vaccine because you might be putting yourself at risk for getting sick. It’s very rare for someone to get sick after having a vaccine or contracting autism. I’ve never seen a huge amount of evidence to say that vaccines cause this, this, and this. Vaccines are here to prevent, not to cause other things. People talk about getting sick after having a vaccine, or contracting something. This is rare, it’s the exception not the rule.
  6. Are there any vaccinations that aren’t required but recommended?
    1. Right now, the CDC has recommended meningitis B, which protects against another strand of meningitis. You’re required to have your two meningitis vaccines. Because you have all of these kids that are going off to college, their going to new environments, they’re living in dorm rooms, and in close contact, you’re putting yourself at a greater risk at picking up a communicable disease. So Men. B is recommended and HPV is recommended based on research.
  7. Will the school be having a vaccination clinic? When? Where?
    1. Our vaccination clinic is Tuesday, April 23rd. It’s offered to juniors becoming seniors. This gives them an opportunity to get up to date on the required vaccines for their senior year, like the second dose of meningitis and the two Hep. A vaccines.

Students anchored to Indiana during mid-semester breaks

Art by Sam Haney

Story By Natalie Clare

Seagulls graze the wave peaks, searching for lunch. The air smells like salt, with sand being picked up in its wind. The sun beats down and… DING DING DING. The alarm clock reads 7 in the morning and we are brought back to reality. Time to go to practice.

I have been a runner since the sixth grade, and have also not been on a spring or fall break vacation since then. With the amount of work that is put into a sport, many athletes cannot afford to take spring break off.

For myself, running is a sport based on building upon speed and endurance. Taking a break can halt your progress, and even lose some. Therefore, I do not have the flexibility to take a vacation right in the middle of season. Leaving would be detrimental to my performance for outdoor season.

This is why we should have longer summer and winter breaks. Spring and fall breaks come very abruptly, right in the middle of a working period. Sports are mid-season. School is halfway through a semester. The breaks are just too long, and not beneficial to the majority of the school population.

According to a National Federation of State High School Associations’ (NFHS) study, over 7.6 million students played sports in the 2010-2011 school year. The NFHS also said that 55.5 percent of all high school students play a sport. Therefore, about 1,000 students at FC play a sport, anchoring half of the school to southern Indiana sports practices.

Although students are not forced to stay, FC is a competitive school. It would be detrimental to not practice with teammates. For track, competing against teammates helps to push you into a faster time, something that is extremely hard to do alone. But in the summer and winter, running is in its off-season and our schedule is much more flexible.

This does not just apply to athletics, but academics are halted because of spring and fall breaks. With a semester being cumulative, having a break between each quarter is difficult to come back from. Students are expected to come back from break ready to move on to the next lesson, or even to pick up from where they left off. There are also teachers who give homework over break. Instead of dragging ourselves into school, we are forced to do homework “from the comfort of our own bed.” Our brains and body never get to use spring and fall break for what they are intended for: giving students a time to rejuvenate and finish the second half of the semester.  

What is the point in a break if we do not actually get to take one? We should shorten both spring and fall break to one week and lengthen summer and winter.

There are many benefits to having long breaks after each semester. In the eyes of an athlete, we are in off season and just conditioning. Therefore, we would actually be able to let our bodies and minds rest. For academics, the semester is ended with finals, so the vast majority of teachers will not assign additional homework over the breaks.

Additionally, colleges are designed to have long summer and winter breaks already. So, if high school is meant to prepare students for college, why not have similar schedules as well? It seems redundant to have the several breaks throughout your whole high school career and then be thrown into a brand new schedule cold turkey once graduated.

With colleges in mind, a longer summer would mean more time to complete college courses early, as well as participate in other activities. Students could get a summer job and learn how to save money before going to college.

The purpose of a break is to allow students, and educators, a much-needed time away from school and allow our bodies and minds time to rest. With each semester being so demanding and mentally taxing, a true break is needed in order to excel to the full extent the whole school year.

As an active student, participating in a demanding sport, honors and high-level classes, and many other after school activities, a longer summer and winter break would be very beneficial to my needs. My schedule mirrors that of many students at FC.

“Longer summer and winter breaks would allow me more time to train for the season. It would also give me a chance to take summer classes,” said sophomore Sarah Langdon. “I have to take personal finance over the summer, but with such a short summer I’m not sure when I can take it. So, I’m going to have to do it over vacation and probably won’t do as well. If we had longer summers, I wouldn’t have to rush through training and summer classes and then finally get a break for a quick vacation.”

Short breaks are redundant in the fact that they are too short to accomplish anything. Spring and fall breaks result in homework because they cut right in the middle of lessons. Summer and winter breaks are too short to participate in summer jobs, camps, or additional classes all at the same time.

So, for those of you going on a sunbathing on a beach in Florida, or hiking up the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina this week, remember those who are anchored to Indiana, turning off that annoying alarm clock, getting up and putting in the work—all while supposedly having a break.