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Baddude writes final column in high school career

Photo by Brock Kennedy

Story by J.D. McKay

It is crazy that after a little over two and a half years I’m writing my last column. Last week was my 100th column, and I think that this is the 120th story I published — that includes all columns and stories published in the paper. That could be a few higher, but I think that it is a pretty safe estimate. I am also going to declare myself the record holder for most stories published during anyone’s time on the Bagpiper staff, or at least while Mr. Lang has been in charge. 

The next thing I want to hit in this column is that I think it is time to retire the baddude mantra I have taken up throughout my high school career. The first simple reason is that at Wheaton the term used is dudes not baddudes. The idea kind of started as a joke because Coach Brian Glesing used that term a lot and I thought it was a funny nickname. But it kind of became a name you earned by your play on the field. If you made a pancake block, you are called a baddude. Had a big hit, baddude. Interception, baddude. Break a tackle, baddude. So it was kind of something you earned, and at Wheaton, I have not earned it yet. Might it come back late in my time at Wheaton? Maybe, but probably not.

Next, I thought I would hit a topic I wrote about a lot. My two and a half years I got to write about how FC dominated New Albany, as well as Jeff and Providence, a lot. So I thought I would just mention that the school year ended with FC as sectional champions over Jeff and New Albany. I also thought I would point out that we were undefeated against the three schools in football, tied the record for largest margin of victory against the Dogs after we scored 50 unanswered earlier this school year, and won sectionals for the first time in 10 years that included both Jeff and New Albany in it. 

I appreciate everyone who has read my column over the past couple of years, and I have enjoyed writing them. I really liked interviewing my fellow Highlander students and giving them credit for their athletic achievements. I am glad I decided to take Mr. Lang’s journalism class my freshman year so I got the chance to write for the paper while in high school. It has been a fun time and I am excited for my future as a Wheaton Thunder. 

J.D. McKay, signing off.

An unconventional but memorable senior year

Story by Gracie Vanover

Like every other senior at FC I never thought I would be finishing my senior year digitally. I expected to be leaning back in my special editor-in-chief swivel chair and counting down the days until I pass the torch. But I did not get to do that the normal way editors before me did. Although these last three months have made my senior year unconventional, to say the least, I would never trade this time for the world.

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Back in the summer of 2019 when I went to the High School Journalism Institute at Indiana University Bloomington. I made tons of friends and still keep in touch with them.

Senior year was not my “picture perfect” dream. I had dreamed of marching band state. I had dreamed of the tears of happiness after my final live show in radio and tv. I dreamed of all the crying and hugging as the bell rang during my last news period of high school. I dreamed of enjoying my last “eighth period” after school with my friends and radio and tv teacher Brian Shaw. Although my dreams did not or will not come true, I am still content with my senior year.

In my time as a senior and team leader I learned so many life lessons. I learned concepts that sometimes I still struggle with. Although I am a work driven person, I learned sometimes you just have to step back and examine life. Sometimes life gets in the way of writing and editing. And that is okay. I am human and not a robot, so I deserve a day or two of doing nothing. 

Not only did this year teach me lessons, but I accomplished so much, unlike any other

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My first year on staff during the 2018-19 school year where I served as the Assistant A&E Editor.

years of high school. If you would have told freshman me that I would be leading an award-winning staff or be a section leader in a band program I had been a part of for years, I would have said you were bluffing. I could have never imagined that I would be standing in front of a news staff every day yelling “Good morning!” and leading a team through our routine. I mean, last year as a junior I would have never imagined being the top dog. 

Normally I feel like people who are in my position would brag or be proud about their work, but that is not me. I never “flex” my awards or scholarships or tell people to read my work. Although I am not ashamed of my work, I have never felt it was anything special or award worthy. I have always been harsh on my writing and felt it was subpar at best. Luckily, I have had amazing advisors and peers to push me to appreciate my own work and see how extraordinary it could be. Without them I would not be in this position. I never even really considered it until my friends told me I would be perfect for the job. Although I was never perfect for this role, it was one I will never forget.

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One of my graduation medals was for completing the journalism path. I never intended on completing this path but now I am glad I did.

Of course, memories are a huge part of any experience. I will never forget laughs while helping during the fifth hour journalism class. I will never forget awarding the members of staff on our “Good Noodle” board. I will never forget comforting people who had outside the newsroom issues. I will never forget reading college admissions essays for people on my staff, and so much more. I will carry memories of every person on my two years of staff, especially ones with our amazing adviser, Jim Lang.

Lang has been through thick and thin with me in my time in this program. He helped me make some of the hardest decisions I have ever had to make. He reassured me of the excellent work I was doing and made sure I did not undermine myself. He recommended me for countless scholarships and awards I would have never thought I deserved. He has not only been an adviser and role model but he has also been a true friend who I can never thank enough.

All I can say is, thank you FC. Your programs have pushed me to be the best I can be. Without the journalism programs led by two great men, I would not be where I am today. So, thank you FC. I will miss you more than you will ever know.

 

A Baddude’s Journal senior athlete spotlight: Talon Hutto

Photo by Grace Allen

Story by J.D. McKay

Last season, boys’ track and field lost sectionals for the first time in nearly two decades. Senior Talon Hutto was planning on avenging that title this year. 

“I’m most disappointed that I won’t be able to win the sectional title that we lost last year,” he said. 

Hutto feels this way because he has been working towards the goal of a sectional championship for several years. 

“I started running when I was in 7th grade,” said Hutto. “We moved to Indiana and I wanted to get involved in something.”

Since Hutto started, he has been working hard to be a talented runner. 

“Hard work is a big factor in how successful I was,” he said. “I probably practice like eight hours a week.” 

After working hard to be successful, team leadership is an obvious next step. 

“I think I would have been a leader on the team this year,” said Hutto. 

Earlier I said Hutto had planned on winning the team sectional championship this year. But he also had important individual goals, too.

“One of my goals was to break the 300-meter hurdles record.” 

Hutto lost his senior year, so he is not ready for his career to be over. 

“I want to run track in college,” he said. “I think it would let me take my athleticism to the next level.”

Hutto has had a lot of success and has the chance to run at the next level because of the best advice he has been given about running. 

He said, “The best advice I’ve gotten about track is showing emotion and running don’t mix.”

Lost in the Archive – Football