Tag Archives: halloween

Football practice costumes from Halloween

By Brock Kennedy

Fall Festival opens up volunteer opportunities for FC students

Freshman Kaeyln Gibson helps out a little girl that is attempting to shoot a basketball. Photo by Rachel Lamb
Freshman Kaeyln Gibson helps out a little girl that is attempting to shoot a basketball. Photo by Rachel Lamb.

Photos by Rachel Lamb

By Megan Johnson

On Thursday Oct. 31, Georgetown Christian Church held their annual Fall Festival. This event allowed children and their parents to walk around the church while playing games, collecting candy, socializing and enjoying the free food. A few FC students who are in the church’s youth group took time out of their Halloween to help their community  with such festivities.

Freshman John Reas shared his opinion on what he believes helping does for his community.

“It means a lot to the kids and helps the parents out. It also gives teens a chance to do something with them.”

One of the major ways they can help is leading a game that children can play.

“It means a lot to the kids. When you’re a kid, everything is magical,” said junior Sam Stermer.

Stermer also shared that he believes children look up to teenagers, which makes the experience even more enjoyable for them.

Freshman Kaelyn Gibson shared that it doesn’t just affect the children, but also the teens who participate.

“I just wanted to do it because it makes me feel good. Like, I’m really doing something.”

During an arm wrestling competition, freshman John Reas plays referee. Photo by Rachel Lamb
During an arm wrestling competition, freshman John Reas plays referee. Photo by Rachel Lamb.
While little boys are busy playing a carpet ball match, junior Sam Stermer acts as a referee. Photo by Rachel Lamb
While little boys are busy playing a carpet ball match, junior Sam Stermer acts as a referee. Photo by Rachel Lamb.
Junior Jacob Huntley calls a child out for "rough-housing" on the blow up obstacle course. Photo by Rachel Lamb
Junior Jacob Huntley calls a child out for “rough-housing” on the blow up obstacle course. Photo by Rachel Lamb.
Freshman Dustin Ramsey spins a wheel to win candy. Photo by Rachel Lamb
Freshman Dustin Ramsey spins a wheel to win candy. Photo by Rachel Lamb.
Freshman Chandler Lewis, dressed as a baseball player, calls out numbers during a bingo game. Photo by Rachel Lamb
Freshman Chandler Lewis, dressed as a baseball player, calls out numbers during a bingo game. Photo by Rachel Lamb.
Dressed as a football player, junior Alexa Tuell marks her card during a game of bingo. Photo by Rachel Lamb
Dressed as a football player, junior Alexa Tuell marks her card during a game of bingo. Photo by Rachel Lamb.

On-line Connection: Waverly Hills offers frightful experiences

By Rachel Nguyen

Waverly Hills Sanatarium is located on 4400 Paralee Lane in Louisville, Kentucky. At first sight, it appears to be an old abandoned building, but its walls hold a much more gruesome history.

In the 1900s, Waverly Hills had the highest Tuberculosis death rate in the country, almost 63,000. One of the most infamous features of the sanatorium was the “Body Chute,” which was built to store the bodies of deceased patients. The chute originally stretched a frightening 525 feet underground, a death tunnel where bodies would be transported on carts to the bottom of the chute, and family members could get the patient’s body or have it cremated.

Sophomore Hunter Hampton has visited Waverly Hills Sanatorium and strongly believes some of the deceased patients are still lurking the dark corridors.

Hampton not only visited Waverly Hills; he spent the night there.

“All night I swear I heard children whispering. I’d hear kids’ laughter. I took pictures throughout the night, and a lot of them had those white orbs in the pictures. If everyone would visit some of these places, they would probably change their mind,” said Hampton.

In 1910, Waverly Hills Sanatorium was built in Louisville, Kentucky as a Tuberculosis hospital and recovery center. Though Waverly was intended for good measures, there were rumors that hinted otherwise.

“I am convinced Waverly Hills is haunted,” said Paige McKinley, a woman who recently toured the building.

Unknown figure caught by  Paige Mckinley, a guest on the Waverly Hills tour. Photo by Paige Mckinley.
Unknown figure caught by Paige Mckinley, a guest on the Waverly Hills tour. Photo by Paige Mckinley.

It was said that the reason for keeping this method of disposal so inconspicuous was for the patients’ sakes; they did not want the patients to lose hope due to the large number of hearses driving up or the piles of bodies accumulating.

When I took the tour, it was a warm summer night around dusk. It seemed as the sun dipped lower in the sky and the tour progressed, the many once laughable ghost stories became more and more realistic. We had the opportunity to venture down into the depths of the ominous body chute, which was just as bleak and morbid as it had been described. I trekked down the tunnel, water seeping from the walls and the air becoming stale and humid. The idea that thousands of corpses had been in this very spot was disturbing, and the silence was unsettling. I wanted to learn more about the patients and their life at Waverly.

The tour guides had expressed that the methods of treatment were not only obsolete, but were sometimes brutal, painful operations that often resulted in death.

One of the typical treatments at the time was shock therapy, where the patients would be strapped down, and the doctors would “shock” the sickness out of them. The actual room used for the shock therapies and other archaic and experimental operations are visited in the tour.

When further research about Waverly was conducted, negative aspects shared on the tour seemed to be somewhat sugarcoated. There were reports of patient abuse, staff suicides, and child seclusion.

The children had to sleep and play in a specific sector of the building; on the top floor, a room with windows that was adjacent to the room for the mentally handicapped. There are many reports about hearing children’s voices and laughter in this sector. Another strange encounter is that on occasion, if a ball is rolled to one end of a hallway, it will roll back to where you are.

There is a room in Waverly Hills that is known for it’s dark story and stands as a twisted legend; Room 502. It is on the top floor, a room simply used for staff maintenance and storage, but it holds a deadly past of its own.

 Waverly had to be quarantined, so it was like a small town of its own, gossip and all. A nurse supposedly got pregnant out of wedlock, and soon enough the whole town knew about it. She later hanged herself in room 502. Then, even more surprisingly,  a nurse who worked in room 502 committed suicide by jumping from the top of the building, right outside of the room. The reasons still remain unknown. Coincidence. . .or not?

 Waverly Hills Sanatorium arguably remains one of the most questioned and distinctively haunted places to visit; however, New Albany has its fair share of paranormal activity as well.

Teachers and students share even more paranormal beliefs

By Bryce Romig

The Old Central Hotel, now known as Habana Blues, is widely known for its ghostly encounters. Many customers and guests complain of seeing a small girl running around the building, mainly the third floor.  The young girl was said to have killed by a car accident right outside of the hotel. Many suicides, murders, and crimes have happened on the third floor, according to local historian Gregg Seidl.

Orbs can be seen on the top left and right of the photo which was taken on the third floor of the Habana Blues restaurant.
Orbs can be seen on the top left and right of the photo which was taken on the third floor of the Habana Blues restaurant. Photo by Bryce Romig.

Paranormal activity also impacts the lives of FC students.

 Junior Emily Shumate shared her experience with a paranormal entity.

“My mom and I will hear a kid crying when there are no kids in my house. I’ll see things go past me when I’m home alone. Sometimes when I’m in bed, I can feel something sitting at the end of it. I consider a ghost to be a spirit who was not ready to pass on,” said Shumate.

Not everyone has always been a firm believer of spiritual existence.

 “I was a skeptic for years, until I actually saw a ghost. That made me a strong believer,” said senior Gavin Sodders.

Sodders went on to tell a story that switched his views.

“My friend’s house is haunted and one day, we literally saw a ghost. I walked out of his basement I saw it turn and walk around to the other side of the wall and out the garage door. When I looked a few seconds later, it was gone. Most of my friends have either heard it or seen something in that house. We’ve seen some unexplainable things.”

Instructional aide Amy Preston has experienced paranormal encounters of her own.

“I have had a personal experience. I believe in my case they are loved ones whose spirits remain to guide me and look over me in this life. I also believe that there are other spirits which are trapped here due to the violent or untimely nature of their deaths.”

Chemistry teacher Jennifer Gohmann is another believer of paranormal activity.

“I believe that there is a great deal of energy in the universe and that this energy could be the cause of spirits or abnormal occurrences.”

Gohman also decided to share some of her eerie experiences.

“Some people would consider my experiences creepy, I just think that they are annoying. From my research I have experienced a type of dream that continues when you are almost awake. In these instances I wake up thinking that there is a person standing at the foot of my bed or in the hall outside my room. On several occasions it seems to be a man in a hooded sweatshirt, one time it appeared to be a female soldier standing outside of my son’s room.”

#SPEAKOUT: The great candy collision

By Danielle Sheally

There are tons of different textures of candy crunchy, smooth, sticky, hard, and gooey.

I think the two best candies on the face of the Earth are Heath Bar and Hershey milk chocolate bar. These are such classic candies that you can’t go wrong. These bring so much comfort when a bad break-up happens or when the most tragic loss in your life comes around. In addition, these candies are easier to fit in your purse or backpack, so they are easily accessible whenever cravings strike.

Heath bars hold so much history that one can almost taste history in the making.  From 1914 until today, the Hershey company has been making smiles run across children’s with their Heath bar. The thing that is most appealing about Heath bars is that they melt in your mouth, but they are also have crunchy toffee on the inside.

Predating the Heath bar is the Hershey Plain Milk Chocolate Bar.  Manufactured since 1900, this chocolate bar has been a symbol for America.  Though, on the outside, it looks and is called plain, it has an explosion of flavor when savored. The Hershey Bar has an amazing amount of sauciness sewn together with smooth decadence.

We ponder, as individuals, what the most frequently chosen candy is when the goblins and ghosts come out to play. Maybe I am right or maybe I am wrong; we’ll let the ghosts decide.

Students reveal their favorite neighborhoods to trick or treat

By Megan Hardin

Today everybody will be rushing home to get ready for what the night has in store for them. Parents will be preparing bowls full of candy to give out while their children get dressed in the costumes of their choice.

Halloween comes only once a year and is the one night where people can dress up and pretend to be something that they are not along with the rest of society. With the norm of dressing up comes the usual activity of going around from house to house and getting free candy. Trick or treating has been the traditional thing to do on Halloween ever since the holiday was created.

There are neighborhoods all over Floyd County that participate in trick or treating, but there a select few that the students here favor. 200 students were asked to give their favorite neighborhoods to go trick or treating, based on their answers these are the top three neighborhoods to go in.

1.  The Woods of Lafayette is located in Floyds Knobs, Indiana. It is known for its very large, glamorous houses that are spread out all over the neighborhood. Because the neighborhood is so large there are a lot of houses that people can go to and get candy. Senior Sara Kost said that the Woods of Lafayette is her favorite place to go on Halloween because there are so many houses there to choose from and you can get a lot more candy there. The candy that is given out there is also another reason why the Woods of Lafayette is the number one neighborhood to go to. Sophomore Tylan Davis went there last Halloween and got more than just the average candy that is usually handed out.

“When I went there some houses were just handing out the candy that all the other houses around were, but there were some houses that I went to that had special made candies. I got a package of these special candies from Schimpff’s and a lot of really oversized candy bars. They were really delicious,” said Daivs.

The Woods of Lafayette is also very easy to find and close to a lot of people’s homes. The location and size of the neighborhood along with the candy that is offered there makes the Woods of Lafayette a great neighborhood to go trick or treating in.

2. Clover Creek, which is located in Greenville, Indiana, is about five minutes away from FC. Although it is not as big as the Woods of Lafayette there are still plenty of houses to go trick or treating at in Clover Creek. Not only do you get treats there but you also get a bit of entertainment. In the yard of one of the residents there is a graveyard scene with a witch to sometimes scare, and always entertain the people trick or treating.

“When I went there they had a lot of the people passing out candy in costume and trying to put on a sort of show. They had people with their yards decorated and performing as their character that they were dressed up as. It was really cool to see because all the other neighborhoods that I went to didn’t have that,” said junior Emily Hardin.

To help make trick or treating more exciting in Clover Creek the whole community comes together, including the fire department.

“Every year our local fire department comes into the neighborhood and passes out candy. They ride around in their gear with their sirens on. I think that they help to attract a lot of the people into the neighborhood. It’s quite a site to see,” said resident of Clover Creek Connie Keith.

The entertainment and the atmosphere make Clover Creek one of the best neighborhoods to go to.

3. Wind Dance Farms is off of Highway 150 in Floyds Knobs, Indiana. It is also a large neighborhood which is what makes it one of the students favorite neighborhoods. Most students like to go trick or treating there due to its size and the amount of candy that they get there.

” I went trick or treating there because I knew that I would get a lot of candy from there and that there would be a lot of houses to go to,” said senior Annie Reisert.

Another reason that Wind Dance Farms is liked by the students is because it is and easy place to get to.

“Since it is close school and off the highway I knew how to get there already. It was very easy to get to and then I didn’t get lost once I was in there. I really liked going trick or treating there,” said junior Kassie Leuthart.

Wind Dace Farms is an easy accessible neighborhood and a good place to go trick or treating for people of any age.

Tonight is the night where people all over Floyd County, and the nation,  will be dressing up and going around in neighborhoods and trick or treating. With Halloween only coming once a year, this is the only opportunity that students get to go out all dressed up and get free candy. No matter what age, a person can always go trick or treating on Halloween. If you are going out for Halloween tonight, stop by one of the listed neighborhoods.