Column: FC set to beat Jeff at Seymour this Friday

By JD McKay

This basketball team has been one of the best in Floyd Central history, comparable to the Pat Graham-led team from 1989. Both teams had a star player, both teams had solid second and third players, and both teams had a villian. Then, it was Damon Bailey. Now it is Romeo Langford.

However, to get to play Langford, we need to beat an athletic Jeffersonville team. When I watched Jeff play earlier this year I was impressed by their athleticism, but aside from senior Bailey Falkenstein, unimpressed by how they scored the ball. I could see that being their achilles heel.

We have scorers. Junior Cobie Barnes and senior Luke Gohmann can light it up from outside or get to the rack and finish tough shots. Senior Brendon Hobson can drive to the hole as well, and with his length, finish tough layups.

Bottom Line- Jeff played us tough this year, and I expect it will be close again, the outcome should not change. The Highlanders can simply score better, and if senior Gabe Shireman finally hits his stride or Gohmann heats up, I am not picking against Floyd.

Score- FC 62 Jeff 56

Relevant film captures interest of moviegoers

Art by Tori Roberts

By Reagan O’Farrell

In a world where terrorism seems to have become relatively inevitable, it is not much of a surprise that movies are now being released exemplifying the heroism of those who take action to prevent it. In the most recent case, that movie is The 15:17 to Paris.

The 15:17 to Paris tells the true story about the endeavors three men took to stop a terrorist bent on killing hundreds of helpless citizens as they took the Thalys train connecting Amsterdam to Paris. This movie, directed by Steven Spielberg, has a notable twist, however—the main cast is the heroes themselves.

This film has a running time of an hour and 36 minutes in which the life stories of Spencer Stone, Alek Skarlatos, and Anthony Sadler are told beginning when they are around 11 years old and ending when they receive membership to the Légion d’Honneur.

Overall, The 15:17 to Paris told a great story of heroism from seemingly ordinary people, demonstrating the power of every individual to make a difference in the world. However, going into the theater, one would expect to learn more about the events that transpired that day in August of 2015 when a man entered a heavily-populated train with the intent to kill, or even gain a look into the unique lives of all the people who stopped that man. Frankly, neither of those happened.

The plot—which was, of course, a true story—seemed interesting on the surface, but the only moments where a person could feel like he or she was interacting with the film, almost there, feeling the rush of adrenaline, happened in the span of a brilliantly produced maybe-fifteen minutes. The rest of it was pretty distant.

This may be because the transition from childhood to adulthood is abrupt, awkward, and lacking in explanations. Not to mention, the dialogue among the children is forced—child actors William Jennings, Bryce Geiser, and Paul-Mikél Williams did their best with what they got, but what they got must not have been good enough.

It may also be because of the most infamous detail being the actors actually playing themselves. Their acting, while a good attempt, is not the best. The conversations are not natural—from sports talk to making light of one another or talking about future plans, it is evident they were not trained to do this kind of work. One develops an appreciation of those who act for a living when watching these three make a go. Then again, maybe it is just really hard to act as yourself in a film.

The best scenes in the movie came when the men were acting in behavior seemingly normal to them. In Spencer’s case, this was following orders on a military base, practicing jiu jitsu, and ultimately taking down the terrorist. He seemed to hold the most spotlight, which may be because he is the one who ran down a man in the face of a gun and faced injuries due to his willingness to protect people.

Overall, The 15:17 to Paris shared an excellent story about heroism in the modern world and about the coming-of-age tale of Spencer, Alek, and Anthony. While the production was a bit awkward, the inspiring tale captivates audiences regardless.

Lent offers chance to grow and renew faith

Art by Tori Roberts

By Erin O’Farrell

Lent is a liturgical season immensely important to the Christian faith, as it focuses on a renewal of the spirit and faith in Christ. This 40-day period preceding Easter calls to all to try to live a life more like that of Jesus through taking this time to focus on faith and preparation for Salvation.

The 40 days gains its significance from two Biblical accounts, one in which Moses spent 40 days on the mountain with the Lord, and another in which Jesus spent 40 days in the desert after his Baptism.

Today, the 40 days are important because they bring about a period of change and renewal. All Christians that observe Lent take this opportunity to better themselves both in their faith and as individuals.

Many people choose to give something up for the 40 days, symbolic of the fasting of both Jesus and Moses during their 40 days. This ranges from giving up soda to avoiding social media- whatever that person feels is best for them.

When I was younger, I mostly saw Lent as a challenge. I still do- I want to stick to my promise and better myself moving forward- but back then, I did not understand its significance, and in the long run, I did not undergo much of a change. I went right back to those habits after the 40 days were up.

Having grown older, I now understand the significance of Lent and try to utilize it as an opportunity to grow closer to my faith, which is the reason most people do abide to it. I want to better myself as a person. This is the true goal of Lent. This time provides an opportunity to change ourselves for the better. This can entail more than giving things up, however.

Another practice seen during Lent is picking up a new, healthy habit whether it be reading the Bible, helping parents around the house, or volunteering. This is equally important as it also helps people grow in their faith and as individuals.

These 40 days can help people on the road to developing better habits. Like I said early on, I had trouble sticking to the commitments I made during Lent, but as I became more dedicated to the idea and saw Lent as something more than a challenge, it became easier to turn the practices into habits that I still follow today.

This time allows people to take an opportunity to enrich their lives. If there is something that you have always wanted to do, but you’ve never had time to do it, take the opportunity Lent has to offer to make it a priority, whether that be going to the gym, getting ahead on homework, or spending more time with people you care about. Simply sticking to this goal during Lent can better your life and help you continue doing it even after the 40 days are up.

This can apply to everyone. Lent has become a time for people to try to better their lives for any reason, and the 40-day period can set them up for a long-term commitment. A study by Phillippa Lally published in the European Journal of Social Psychology found that the average time period needed to develop a new habit is just over 60 days. Spending the 40 days of Lent (or 46, if you include Sundays) working on this habit, therefore, acts as a major boost to committing to the new habit, no matter what it may be. This can help strengthen you individually and spiritually for the long run, and having the support of so many people during the beginning of your journey throughout the Lenten season can make it so much easier to stick to your plan.

Whether you have a life-changing goal or are taking small steps to better your life, 40 days is an accomplishment. Maybe doing something as simple as helping more with chores around the house does not seem like a spiritual commitment, but by becoming a better person, you are becoming a stronger Christian. Every single kind act or step in the positive direction helps you and others grow to appreciate the world and people around you. It helps you recognize and value your faith. Those that see your commitment and your kindness can feel inspired by it.

Therefore, Lent is not simply a time to prove to others that you can do something. It is a time to grow in your faith and devotion to God. This can be done during any time of the year, but Lent lends itself as the perfect time period because of the meaning behind the season and because others will be striding alongside you.

Lent began on Valentine’s Day this year, so it seems fitting that we should take this opportunity to show our love for those important to us. During this time of change and renewal, it is important to remember that we are not simply trying to better our own lives, but also the lives of everyone around us through our actions.

Senior Isabelle Langford earns Girl Scouts Gold Award

Photo by Shelby Pennington

By Ky Haney

Senior Isabelle Langford recently accepted her Gold Award for Girl Scouts, the highest award a Girl Scout can earn. The Girl Scouts describe it as “the most difficult to to earn” and challenges winners to “change the world — or at least your corner of it.”

Langford has been involved with Girl Scouts since she was in first grade. “Girl Scouts stand for building a better, more accepting world. People can still help out with a lot of different things. I’ve always had fun in it,” said Langford.

She heard other girls call themselves Daisies, but she was not sure what that meant until she asked and signed up for Girl Scouts. She stayed in this for years and eventually her troop started leaving. However, Langford did not.

“I’m proud to be in this because of what it stands for. It’s something girls can get involved with, it doesn’t really require talent. It just requires commitment, being human and helping other humans out,” said Langford.

Girl Scouts is full of many valuable activities that help members learn lifelong skills, including just being kind to each other. Langford really liked getting patches when she was younger, saying it felt like going on adventures.

This feeling continued with her Gold Award, which recognizes her commitment and requires honorees to to identify an issue, investigate it, create a plan, present the plan and gather feedback, take action, and educate and inspire.

“When getting the Gold Award, you go on something called a journey, and it is where you get a book. You answer all these questions about different things. You have to do the journey before you can even start on getting your Gold Award,” she said.

Langford is very proud of this award and worked hard to earn it. Her dedication is shown with the fact that she does many other activities outside of school, along with Girl Scouts. She is in handbells, choir, dance, and theatre. Many of her big festivals in Girl Scouts are actually on Saturdays, when her dance class takes place.

Her dedication was not for nothing. Langford wanted to start sophomore year, but she had to think of a plan for her first step. She started on her Gold Award in August of her junior year. It took her until March to get it approved, though.

She made a timeline of every single time FC went to the International Thespian Festival. Since many people did not know what this festival was, Langford made a PowerPoint and a timeline showing how important this was, highlighting the accomplishments of FC Theatre.

“When you get your Gold Award, you are supposed to branch out to different communities. I needed different playbills and I asked on Twitter for people to send it, and they did. People from Georgia, people from Florida, it just sparked this whole network of people reminiscing of their times in theatre,” said Langford. “They kept saying ‘Whoever this girl is, stay in Girl Scouts’.”

The Student Spotlight (February 2018)

The Student Spotlight is a new gallery that displays the unique talents of multiple individual FC photographers, providing students with the ability to have their work published and recognized.

In addition to those printed in the school newspaper, more photos will be uploaded with each issue in order to expose and publish multiple other students’ work.


The official news source of Floyd Central High School