Category Archives: home slide

FC plays New Albany Friday in continuation of historic rivalry

Photo by Kate Zuverink

Story by J.D. McKay

Every year FC and New Albany play each other about three weeks into the season, then again to end one of the team’s season. These games make for some exciting basketball. However, the best game to go to is the regular season game. The crowds are packed into smaller gyms and avoiding the hour drive to Seymour gets lots of students at the games. 

If you have read my previews in the past, you will notice a common theme in all of them. New Albany head coach Jim Shannon will find a way to stop our best player. But, since Cobie Barnes and Romeo Langford have graduated, it is a completely new game compared to the last few years. 

First, as I said above, Shannon will find a way to limit junior Jake Heidbreder. If Heidbreder can outplay whatever they have in store for him, things will go our way. If he can drop 15 points, I almost guarantee a win because of how low scoring these games usually are.

The next key to win comes from sophomore Cole Harritt. Harritt has a silky jumper and can light it up from three. He dropped 23 last week against Castle, and most of those points came from threes. He is 12 for 25 from three (48 percent) so far this year. In our closest game, against Christian Academy, he did not shoot well. I think if he lights it up again, we should be able to win.

The last key we need is for a third scorer to step up. Freshman Caleb Washington has played well so far this year, especially on the offensive glass. If he can get a few offensive boards and putbacks, he could be that guy. It could also be senior Grant Gohmann. Gohmann is pretty good at getting the ball in the hoop, but has a struggled at times this year. If he is able to hit a few shots, he could give the Dogs some trouble.

A few other things to note- New Albany will be without senior Julien Hunter, who is out with a stress reaction in his foot. Senior Trey Hourigan is returning for the Dogs after being suspended for two games. New Albany sophomore guard Tucker Biven can score; he dropped 32 last week in Shannon’s 400th win at New Albany. The Dogs also lost 68-43 two weeks ago to Bloomington South, that was their worst loss in several years. The Highlanders are giving up 46 points per game compared to the Bulldogs 56. New Albany is 1-1 and FC is 5-0. Both teams have played Evansville Harrison. We won 67-47, they won 68-45. 

Bottom Line- Both of these teams have lost quite a bit of talent over the past couple years. However, they also both have some young talent that can score. But, without Julien Hunter, I think the Dogs lose a big part of their offense and will rely on Biven. If our defense, which is notoriously strong, can limit Biven and get one or two guys going besides Heidbreder, New Albany will not have an answer. Final Score- FC 53 NA 51

The New Albany-Floyd Central game is finally here, and it will be the rowdiest game in the state, so do not miss it.

 

 

Basketball beat Castle 66-62 Friday night

By Kate Zuverink

Indiana rallies around Bowsman family with football

Photos Courtesy of Noah Lukinovich

Story by J.D. McKay

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West Washington’s field lit up for anyone who wanted to come by and remember their deceased coach. Photo courtesy of Noah Lukinovich


Earlier this year, I wrote a column about how sports can make an enormous impact on a community and nation. It focused on national tragedies with a focus on 9/11
because I published it on 9/11. 

Recently, another heart breaking event happened in the area with the passing of head West Washington football coach and athletic director Phillip Bowsman. He died unexpectedly in the hospital on Nov. 25 after suffering a stroke during the semi-state championship game on Nov. 22. His son was the starting quarterback for the team. 

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FC’s field lit from a distance. Photo courtesy of Noah Lukinovich


But the state has rallied around the Bowsman family. Last Friday night, the memorial was held on West Washington’s field. But as this was happening, schools all over the state were turning on their football field lights to remember coach Bowsman. The first school to do it was Southwestern. They do not have a football field but had a moment of silence and lit their basketball gym with cell phone flash lights to remember the coach. 

By the time Friday came around, this was known throughout the whole state. A few colleges and many high schools began posting pictures of their lit-up football fields with the hashtag Bowsmanstrong. From what I could find, the number was at least 153 schools, but possibly as many as 291, including at least seven out of eight HHC teams. That also includes two schools in Iowa, Bishop Garrigan, over a 10-hour drive away, and North Scott. 

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A few people wander off West Washington’s field after visiting Bowsman’s memorial. Photo courtesy of Noah Lukinovich


This is an incredibly sad story. But it shows the power sports have. One simple action, turning on stadium lights, shows that the Bowsman family was not alone, and the whole state was think of them in their tough time.  

 

Handbell students take on New York City

Story by Destiny Love

A chorus of handbells ring through Central Park as the bustling sounds of the city are temporarily ignored for the enjoyment of the holiday music.

“This trip is going to be exciting, but also crazy. We have packed a lot of stuff in the span of three days for our multiple performances,” said senior Aaron Seay. 

All of the arts programs have their own trips that they take for performances. However, this trip for the handbells holds many new experiences for the group.

“We will leave Thursday, Thanksgiving morning early. We will arrive in New York City Thursday afternoon. On Friday we will be performing at Radio City Music Hall as a pre-show to the Radio City Rockettes,” said choir and handbells director Angela Hampton. 

Fifteen students will be attending the NYC trip with Hampton and assistant director Briston Hatchell for their performance. Many of the students have been in handbells for several years, but this performance could be a once in a lifetime opportunity. 

“I am most excited about getting to experience NYC for the first time with a great group of friends and playing with so many ringers,” said senior Delaney Agnew. “We are performing a bunch of the common Christmas songs like ‘Joy to the World,’ ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas,’ ‘Deck the Halls,’ and ‘Jingle Bells.’

The trip to New York City will have many other new opportunities for the young musicians. 

“It will be a really great experience for us. Not only for being able to play there, but we will be playing with a lot of ringers from the New York area and beyond. We will also be conducted by one of our favorite conductors for handbells: Kevin McChesney, so the kids are really excited to meet him and play under his direction,” said Hampton.

A lot will be going on this Thanksgiving weekend in New York City, but the handbells group is ready to take on this new performance opportunity.

“The handbells have never gone to New York before. We travel every other year. Being there Thanksgiving weekend, that is a really big time in NYC with the Thanksgiving Day Parade and the shopping and just being New York. This is a really different opportunity,” said Hampton. 

This will not be the first time a music group from FC have performed in New York City, but it is another to add to the books with more planned in the future. 

“It is every musician’s dream to either say they have played in Radio City or Carnegie Hall,” said Hampton. “I think it is something they will be able to look on later in their life and say ‘I got to do that.’”

Theatre classes provide new perspective

Art by Abby Brown

Story by Kennedy Page, Jasmine Hodapp, and Chloe Davidson

When walking into a theatre class one might be overwhelmed by the energy of the students. The atmosphere is certainly a unique one. Though a class like theatre is not as rigidly structured as a typical one, there is still a need for effort and creativity. 

Typically we see theatre through a completely different lens. When the subject is mentioned, generally one thinks of dramatic performances on stage, but a lot more goes on in the class than what people perceive. 

It’s a more creative class than most because we do our own blockings for scenes and there isn’t one specific way we have to do everything,” said sophomore Samantha Temple. She like many other students find that to be a key draw to the class among other things.

 It is not all fun and games, but involves a lot of hard work. “The atmosphere of the class is different as it requires discipline and work ethic to keep things working,” said theatre teacher Robbie Steiner. Performance, like anything else, is improved with practice. 

The students are involved in all aspects of theatre, and many students report enjoying giving their all. Besides just acting, the students do public relations, help with sets, learn about famous playwrights, and even write scripts of their own. Everyone is given an opportunity to explore what they want to learn. 

The class structure changes with new events and sections of the curriculum. This allows for students to be able explore roles in a unique and prepared way. “I really love getting to explore a whole new person while still being myself,” said junior Charlotte Brown. 

The impact on teachers and the FC community of students has been very positive. It, to many, has fostered a sense of purpose and love for giving back. “I love the feeling I get when I’m on stage. It’s this feeling where you know all the hard work you have put in is being put into the world,” said junior Trevin Chandler.

Some students even report that theatre has impacted their life outside of the class. Some may use their new skill set to explore more theatre extracurriculars, and some may use their newfound love for theatre even later on in life for serious career choices. I’d like to teach theatre as a career,” said Brown.

“I’m a little more confident in my acting and in the actual world,” said Temple. Many others like her find the class is open to all students. It works to provide an intimate and emotionally vulnerable time for all those that pursue it. 

But more than that, theatre is a community. “The friends you make though the program and the experiences and memories you make are amazing,” said Chandler. 

That’s why this class, to many students and teachers, is unlike any other. Why so many people are drawn to it and why there’s such strong feelings towards it. Many that are a part of the program feel that theatre creates genuine connection within a unique experience, and people will never stop loving it. “The class is a good way to get away from reality and clear your mind. Give it a try. Don’t judge it too fast,” said senior Jason Corrado.