Athletes power through busy schedules


By J.D. McKay

On each Friday night this upcoming fall, I will be taking the field ready to play against whomever the opponent may be. That will probably be the only time many of my readers will ever see me performing. Some may see me on a Tuesday night or Saturday morning in the spring throwing the 1.6 kilogram discus. But the number who see me do that is far lower. However, these two events and daily practice is probably all that they think goes into my sport. That is not true, and I will try to walk through the schedule many athletes, including myself, have to deal with.

School starts ridiculously early, earlier than the typical 9-5 job, at 7:40 a.m. That means that to be on time we need to wake up by at least 7 a.m., probably earlier. Some athletes, like senior thrower Austin Gootee, live in places like Lanesville. These athletes have to wake up earlier to account for the long drive. Some of us also have to get up before school for workouts. Strength coach Donnie Gumble runs a weight lifting team that practices before school, and the swim team often has practices starting at 6 a.m.

After getting to school, we go through almost a seven-hour school day. That includes activities that can wear us out. Some of these activities including tests, presentations, and weight lifting class. If I just finished a very tough school day, going to practice can be a drag.

After a seven-hour school day, I have practice. That can last until nearly 7 p.m. in the beginning of football season. However, typically practices end around 6 p.m. or a little before. This makes players tired after a long school day.

When we finally get home, typically around 6:15 p.m., some things still need to happen. Dinner needs to be eaten to stay at the top of our game. Showers need to be taken, so our mothers do not kill us. Let us just say after all this it is 7 p.m. on a typical night. Then comes homework. It could take four-plus hours for some of the tougher schedules, but in general it is probably closer to two hours. That means after everything for school is done, it is 9 p.m. If you add some extra studying in, that time becomes 9:30.

After this, if I was very responsible, I would brush my teeth and go to bed. But, I am in high school and social media, Netflix, and Clash of Clans are all appealing after going pretty hard for 14 hours. If I account for a very conservative 30 minutes for other entertainment, I am in bed by 10 p.m. Which is pretty good, giving me eight hours of sleep if I am up by 6 the next day. However, if I am feeling particularly irresponsible, or procrastinate a project, it is closer to 10:30 or 11 p.m. Seven hours of sleep may sound like a decent amount, but sleep is one of the most important parts of athletics. It lets those muscles really rest after a long day of workouts, school, and practice.

This is does not improve much on the weekends. Often, Saturday mornings are meet days or early practice days. Sundays are our only days off, and often I and the other athletes who want to be successful go out and find time to practice or workout. Even out of season this schedule is hectic with workouts getting in the way.

Athletes are not the only people at FC to have crazy schedules. Students who take all AP classes or IB classes have a crazy hard schedule that gives a lot of work. We may not even have the hardest schedule as theater puts in crazy hours, including Sundays, to practice. Next time you see any other athlete or me performing, know that it was not just a two-hour practice and seven hour school day that got us to that point. It took a lot of hard work and mental toughness that allowed FC athletes to perform at a high level.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.